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#1489248 - 04/05/13 09:09 AM New gun laws info
EnCon Police Offline

Moderator

Registered: 03/01/04
Posts: 3874
First of all - We (EnCon Police) have nothing to do with the gun laws other than how they are used for hunting. All registration, pistol, long gun and ammo permits are the responsibility of the DESPP (State Police). There are a lot of unanswered questions related to the new laws....WE have a lot of unanswered questions for the new laws.

If you need specifics regarding how the law would impact you at home, at work or out and about in the public, you need to contact the State Police and ask the questions. We're still trying to figure out how it would impact hunters. As those areas are clarified I will share the info with you.

In the mean time, following is an analysis by the Office of Legislative Research that takes the 130 whatever pages and condenses it all down into readable English.

http://www.cga.ct.gov/2013/BA/2013SB-01160-R00-BA.htm

OLR Bill Analysis

SB 1160

Emergency Certification

AN ACT CONCERNING GUN VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND CHILDREN'S SAFETY.

SUMMARY:

The bill makes numerous changes in the laws governing firearms. The major changes pertain to assault weapons, handguns (pistols and revolvers), long guns (rifles and shotguns), and large capacity magazines (LCM).

With regard to firearms, the bill, among other things, expands the ban on assault weapons, bans the sale or purchase of large capacity magazines (LCMs) that can hold more than 10 rounds of ammunition, mandates the establishment of a deadly weapon offender registry, bans armor-piercing bullets, adds two members to the Board of Firearms Permit Examiners, expands the circumstances in which mental health history disqualifies a person for gun permits or other gun credentials, requires anyone buying ammunition to have an ammunition certificate or other gun credential, and appropriates $ 1 million to DESPP for FY 14 to fund the statewide firearms trafficking task force.

Among its mental health provisions, the bill creates a 20-member task force to study the provision of behavioral health services in Connecticut and report to the legislature by February 1, 2014. It also requires the Department of Mental Health and Addition Services (DMHAS) to:

1. administer a mental health first aid training program, in consultation with the Department of Education (DOE);

2. implement an assertive community treatment (ACT) program in three additional cities (programs currently operate in Manchester, Middletown, New Britain, and Norwich); and

3. provide case management and care coordination services to up to 100 people with mental illness who are involved in the probate court system and are not receiving these services.

Finally, the bill requires the Department of Children and Families (DCF) commissioner, by January 1, 2014, to establish and implement a regional behavioral health consultation and care coordination program for primary care providers who serve children.

The bill makes various changes to the process for grieving adverse determinations (e. g. , claims denials) by health insurers. Among other things, it reduces the time health insurers have to (1) make initial determinations on requests for treatments for certain mental or substance use disorders and (2) review claim denials and other adverse determinations of such requests. It expands the role of and qualifications required for health care professionals who evaluate the appropriateness of adverse determinations. The bill also requires the Insurance Commissioner to seek input on methods the department might use to check for compliance with state and federal mental health coverage parity laws and report on these issues to the Insurance and Public Health committees.

Lastly, the bill makes numerous conforming changes.

The bill (1) creates a new council to establish new school safety infrastructure standards, (2) authorizes up to $ 15 million in bonds for a new competitive grant program for school safety projects, and (3) establishes a procedure leading to new requirements under the school construction law.

It also requires school districts to perform a number of new school safety activities including establishing safety and security plans and committees for each school.

Additionally, the bill requires public and independent institutions of higher education to develop campus security plans, undergo safety audits, and form campus threat assessment teams.

It also (1) requires mental health first aid training for school district staff, (2) gives safe school climate committees new responsibilities, (3) creates a school security consultant registry, and (4) changes the law regarding civil service testing for UConn and state university police.

It also repeals an unused $ 3 million bond authorization, initially created in 2007 for a school security infrastructure program.

EFFECTIVE DATE: Various, see below

§ 1 – LONG GUN SALES

The bill creates several requirements regarding the sale of long guns, except between federally-licensed firearm (1) manufacturers and dealers, (2) importers and dealers, or (3) dealers.

Age Restriction on Retail Sale of Long Guns

With one exception, the bill prohibits the retail sale of long guns to anyone under 18 years of age. If the long gun is a semi-automatic centerfire rifle that has or accepts a magazine with a capacity of more than five rounds, the purchaser must be at least 21. This stricter limitation does not apply to members or employees of local police departments, the Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection (DESPP), or the Department of Correction (DOC), or state or U. S. military or naval members, for use in the discharge of their duties.

Credential Required to Buy or Receive Long Gun

The bill creates a new long gun eligibility certificate (see below for details). On and after April 1, 2014, the bill requires anyone, except a federal marshal, parole officer, or peace officer, buying or receiving a long gun to have a long gun eligibility certificate, handgun permit, handgun dealer permit, or handgun eligibility certificate.

Sales Receipt

The bill adds a buyer's date and place of birth to the information required on a long gun receipt. Existing law requires such receipts to also contain the (1) buyer's name and address; (2) firearm make, model, serial number, and caliber, and general description; and (3) transfer date.

Long Gun Sales By Someone Other Than Gun Dealers

Current law does not regulate the private sale of long guns. The bill prohibits the sale or transfer of long guns by someone who is not a federally-licensed gun dealer, manufacturer, or importer to someone who is not such a licensee, unless the transaction has been authorized by DESPP or specified background check requirements have been met. Specifically, the requirements are as follows:

1. The prospective transferor and transferee must comply with the documentation and authorization requirements that apply to retail sales of long guns (e. g. , (a) the seller must document the transaction with DESPP, maintain copies of the record, and obtain an authorization number from DESPP; (b) the buyer must undergo a national instant criminal background check; (c) the gun cannot be loaded when transferred; and (d) DESPP must authorize or deny the sale or transfer); or

2. a federally-licensed firearm dealer, upon the request of the prospective transferor or transferee, must consent to initiate a national instant criminal background check system (NICS) in accordance with the procedures set forth below, and the background check must show that the transferee is eligible to receive the gun.

It appears that option (2) is available only on and after January 1, 2014. To proceed under this option, the prospective transferor or transferee must provide the consenting dealer with the transferee's name, gender, race, date of birth, and state of residence. If necessary to verify the person's identity, they may also provide a unique numeric identifier (such as a Social Security number) and additional identifiers (such as height, weight, eye and hair color, and place of birth).

The prospective transferee must present to the dealer his or her gun credential (gun eligibility certificate, handgun permit, handgun sale permit, or handgun eligibility certificate). The dealer can charge up to $ 20 for initiating the background check.

The dealer must initiate the background check by contacting the NICS operations center. The dealer must immediately notify the prospective transferor or transferee of the response from the center. The sale or transfer cannot take place if the response indicates the prospective transferee is ineligible to receive the gun.

When the transaction is completed, the transferor or transferee must complete a DESPP-prescribed form containing the (1) transferor's name, address, and firearm permit or certificate number, if any; (2) transferee's name, address, date and place of birth, and firearm permit or certificate number; (3) sale or transfer date; (4) caliber, make, model, and manufacturer's number and a general description of the gun; and (5) the background check transaction number. The bill imposes similar transmission and retention requirements for the form as apply to sales of long guns by dealers.

Waiting Period

Current law contains a two-week waiting period for long gun purchases from gun dealers, with certain exceptions (e. g. , if the buyer holds certain gun credentials). Under the bill, this waiting period only applies prior to April 1, 2014. The bill also makes a conforming change by adding an exception to the waiting period if the buyer has a long gun eligibility certificate. It appears that starting April 1, 2014, the bill ties delivery to the date DESPP issues an authorization number for the transaction.

Penalties

Current law does not specify a penalty for transferring a long gun at retail in violation of the law's requirements. The bill generally makes it a class D felony to violate such requirements or any of the provisions specified above pertaining to long gun sales (whether at retail or otherwise). The bill makes it a class B felony if the person transferring the firearm knows that it is stolen or that the manufacturer's number or serial number has been altered, removed, or obliterated. In addition to these felony penalties, anyone who violates the bill's or existing law's requirements for long gun sales must forfeit any long guns found on the person.

The bill allows a court to suspend prosecution for a first time minor violation under these provisions, under the same procedures as apply to such suspensions under existing law for handgun sale violations.

EFFECTIVE DATE: upon passage

§§ 2-7 — LONG GUN ELIGIBILITY CERTIFICATE

The bill creates a new gun credential: a long gun eligibility certificate. The bill sets the minimum age for a long gun eligibility certificate at 18, whereas existing law sets a minimum age of 21 for a handgun eligibility certificate. Otherwise, the bill's provisions concerning the long gun eligibility certificate are substantially similar to the provisions for handgun eligibility certificates under existing law and the bill.

Thus, among numerous other things:

1. DESPP issues the long gun eligibility certificates;

2. the fee for an initial or renewal certificate is $ 35, and the certificate is good for five years;

3. applicants are ineligible for various reasons, including convictions for a felony or specified misdemeanors or certain mental health history;

4. applicants must complete background checks;

5. anyone aggrieved by an adverse action concerning a certificate or application may appeal to the Board of Firearms Permit Examiners, following existing procedures in statutes for appeals of issuing officials' decisions for other gun credentials; and

6. the DESPP commissioner must include information about such certificates in the database he currently maintains for sellers to verify the validity of a purchaser's gun credential.

Unlike the case with handgun eligibility certificates, the bill does not provide for temporary eligibility certificates for long guns.

As is the case for handgun eligibility certificates, a long gun eligibility certificate can be revoked upon the occurrence of any event that would have disqualified the holder from being issued the certificate. If the certificate is revoked, DESPP must notify the person in writing, and the person must deliver it to the commissioner. Failure to deliver it within five days of the notification is a class A misdemeanor.

EFFECTIVE DATE: July 1, 2013

§ 9 — SALE OF CONTRABAND LONG GUNS AT AUCTION

By law, the state may sell at public auction guns the court determines to be contraband. Existing law provides that rifles and shotguns may only be sold at such auctions to people qualified under federal law to purchase them. The bill also requires the purchaser to have a long gun eligibility certificate.

EFFECTIVE DATE: July 1, 2013

§§ 8, 10-11, 57-58 — MENTAL HEALTH AND ELIGIBILITY FOR GUN CREDENTIALS

The bill broadens the mental health provisions that disqualify a person for a gun permit or handgun eligibility certificate. The same prohibitions also apply under the bill to the long gun eligibility certificate.

Under current law, a person confined in a psychiatric hospital by probate court order within the preceding 12 months of an application is ineligible for a gun permit or eligibility certificate. The bill extends this period to 60 months.

The bill also makes ineligible any person who voluntarily admitted himself or herself to a psychiatric hospital, on or after October 1, 2013, during the preceding six months. But someone is not ineligible for voluntary admissions solely due to alcohol or drug treatment.

The bill makes conforming changes to the responsibilities of the DESPP and DMHAS commissioners and psychiatric hospitals regarding such voluntary admissions. Thus, as is currently the case regarding involuntary commitments occurring within the applicable period:

1. DMHAS must maintain information on voluntary admissions, and make that information available to the DESPP commissioner to carry out his obligations pertaining to gun credentials;

2. the DESPP commissioner must verify from DMHAS that a person applying for a gun credential was not subject to such a voluntary admission, and DMHAS must report such information to DESPP;

3. if he determines that an applicant was subject to voluntary admission, he must report the status of the person's application to DMHAS;

4. the DMHAS commissioner must obtain from DESPP the status of any such applications for anyone who has been voluntarily admitted;

5. DMHAS must advise the psychiatric hospital to which a person has been voluntarily admitted of the status of a gun application, as reported by DESPP; and

6. the DMHAS commissioner and the hospital must maintain as confidential any such information they receive on the status of permit applications.

As part of this process, the bill requires psychiatric hospitals, without delay, to notify the DMHAS commissioner when a person is voluntarily admitted to the hospital for care and treatment of a psychiatric disability, other than admission solely for alcohol or drug treatment. The hospital must at least provide the person's name, address, sex, date of birth, and date of admission. The DMHAS commissioner must maintain such identifying information on all voluntary admissions occurring on and after July 1, 2013.

EFFECTIVE DATE: the provisions changing the eligibility criteria for gun permits and eligibility certificates, and requiring psychiatric hospitals to notify DMHAS about voluntary admissions, are effective October 1, 2013; the other provisions are effective July 1, 2013.

§§ 12-13 — TECHNICAL OR CONFORMING CHANGES

EFFECTIVE DATE: Upon passage

§§ 14-17 — AMMUNITION SALES

The bill generally bars the sale of ammunition or an ammunition magazine to anyone under age 18.

The bill creates an ammunition certificate (see below). Starting October 1, 2013, the bill generally prohibits anyone from selling ammunition or an ammunition magazine to any buyer unless he or she:

1. has a handgun permit, gun sale permit, or long gun or handgun eligibility certificate, and presents such a credential to the seller, or

2. has an ammunition certificate and presents to the seller (a) the certificate and (b) a driver's license, passport, or other valid government-issued identification that contains the person's photograph and date of birth.

The bill defines “ammunition” as a loaded cartridge, consisting of a primed case, propellant, or projectile, designed for use in any firearm. It defines “magazine” as a firearm magazine, belt, drum, feed strip, or similar device that accepts ammunition.

Anyone who violates these provisions commits a class D felony.

Under the bill, these restrictions and requirements do not apply to sales or other transfers of ammunition between federally licensed firearm (1) manufacturers and dealers, (2) importers and dealers, or (3) dealers.

Ammunition Certificate

Under the bill, a person must be age 18 or older to apply for an ammunition certificate. To apply, the person must request the DESPP commissioner to issue the certificate and to conduct a national criminal background check, using only the person's name and date of birth.

After conducting the background check, the commissioner must issue the certificate unless he determines, based on the results, that the person would be ineligible to be issued a long gun eligibility certificate. But if the person would be ineligible for that certificate due to certain criminal convictions, the person is ineligible for the ammunition certificate only for violations committed on or July 1, 2013.

The certificate must be in a DESPP commissioner-prescribed form. It must contain an identification number and the certificate holder's name, address, date of birth, and signature.

The bill's provisions on several matters regarding ammunition certificates are similar to provisions in the bill and existing law for handgun and long gun eligibility certificates. This includes matters concerning fees; the requirement to report address changes; confidentiality of the person's name and address with exceptions; and revocation of certificates.

For example, the fee for the initial and renewal certificate is $ 35, and the certificate is good for five years. The bill specifies that this fee is in addition to fees for the background check.

Unlike the case with the handgun and long gun eligibility certificates, the DESPP commissioner is not required to notify ammunition certificate holders at least 90 days in advance of the date the certificate is set to expire.

EFFECTIVE DATE: the restrictions on ammunition sales are effective upon passage; the provisions creating an ammunition certificate are effective July 1, 2013

§ 18-22 — ESTABLISHMENT OF DEADLY WEAPON OFFENDER REGISTRY

By January 1, 2014, the bill requires DESPP to establish and maintain a registry of everyone (1) convicted of an offense committed with a deadly weapon or (2) found not guilty by reason of mental disease or defect for such an offense, notwithstanding any pending appeal. Under law and the bill, a deadly weapon is any weapon, whether loaded or unloaded, from which a shot may be discharged, or a switchblade knife, gravity knife, bill, blackjack, bludgeon, or metal knuckles.

Table 1 lists the offenses the bill designates as deadly weapon offenses.

Table 1: Deadly Weapon Offenses

Interference with the legislative process


2-1e(c)

Possessing or carrying a handgun where prohibited by law or the person who owns or exercises control over the premises


29-28(e)

Sell or otherwise transfer handgun to ineligible person, violation of transfer procedures


29-33(a) to (e)

Failure to document handgun transfer with DESPP


29-33(e)

Sell or transfer handgun in violation of statutory transfer procedures


29-33(i)

Make false statement or give false information in connection with purchase, sale, delivery or other transfer of handgun


29-34

Illegally sell, barter, hire, lend, give, deliver, or otherwise transfer handgun to anyone under age 21


29-34

Carry a handgun without a permit


29-35(a)

Remove, deface, alter or obliterate the name of any maker or model or any maker's number or other mark of identification mark on any firearm


29-36

Failure to transfer, deliver, or surrender handguns by persons ineligible to possess them


29-36k

Violation of transfer procedures for long guns; failure to document transfer


29-37a

False statement or information in connection with sale or transfer of long gun


29-37e

Noncompliance with law governing sale, delivery, or transfer of firearms at gun show


29-37g(c)

Buy firearms intending to transfer it to ineligible person (“strawman purchase”)


29-37j

Ineligible person soliciting, employing, or assisting anyone in strawman purchasing


29-37j

Possess or use a machine gun in the perpetration or attempted perpetration of a violent crime


53-202(b)

Uses or possesses a machine for an offensive or aggressive purpose


53-202(c)

Transfer, sell or give a machine gun to a person under age 16


53-202(c)

Illegally sells, gives, distributes, transports, or imports assault weapon


53-202b

Illegally possesses assault weapon


53-202c

Failure to register machine gun


53-202 (g)

Commit a class A, B, or C felony with an assault weapon


53-202j

Commit an A, B, or C felony with firearm other than assault weapon


53-202k

Knowingly distribute, transport, import, or keep for sale armor piercing . 50 caliber bullet or incendiary . 50 caliber bullet


53-202l

Firearm trafficking


53-202aa

Unlawful training in use of firearms, explosives or incendiary devices or techniques capable of causing injury


53-206b

Sell, deliver, or provide firearm to another person to engage in conduct constituting an offense or under circumstances in which he should know that such other person intends to use such firearm in such conduct


53a-8(b)

Manslaughter in the 1st degree with a firearm


53a-55a

Manslaughter in the 2nd degree with a firearm


53a-56a

Assault in the second degree with a firearm


53a-60a

Assault of an elderly, blind, disabled or pregnant person or a person with intellectual disability in the 2nd degree with a firearm


53a-60c

Sexual assault in the 3rd degree with a firearm


53a-72b

Kidnapping in the 1st degree with a firearm


53a-92a

Kidnapping in the 2nd degree with a firearm


53a-94a

Burglary in the 2nd degree with a firearm


53a-102a

Burglary in the 3rd degree with a firearm


53a-103a

Possession of a sawed off shotgun or silencer


53a-211

Stealing a firearm


53a-212

Criminal use of a firearm or electronic defense weapon


53a-216

Criminal possession of a firearm or electronic defense weapon


53a-217

Criminally negligent storage of a firearm


53a-217a

Illegal possession of a weapon on school grounds


53a-217b

Criminal possession of a handgun


53a-217c

Second or subsequent violation of failure to report the loss or theft of a firearm


53-202g

A violation of any statute that constitutes a felony, provided the court makes a finding that, at the time of the violation, the person used a firearm, or was armed with and threatened the use of, or displayed or represented by words or conduct that the person possessed, a firearm.


In cooperation with DOC, the Office of the Chief Court Administrator, and the Psychiatric Security Review Board, DESPP must develop appropriate forms for agencies and individuals to use to report registration information, including address changes. DESPP must enter registration information it receives into the registry and notify the local police department or state police troop having jurisdiction where a registrant lives or plans to live.

Registrants must notify DESPP when they move and DESPP must enter the information into the registry and notify the local police department or state police troop having jurisdiction where the registrant previously lived and where he or she relocated. The DESPP commissioner must also ensure that the name and residence address of each registrant is available through the department's Connecticut On-Line Law Enforcement Communication Teleprocessing system. If a registrant moves to another state, DESPP may notify that state's state police agency or such other agency that maintains registry information, if known.

DESPP may suspend the registration of anyone incarcerated, under civil commitment, or living out of state. During that time, it may withdraw the registration information from access to law enforcement agencies. When the registrant is released from incarceration or civil commitment or resumes living in the state, DESPP must reinstate the registration and redistribute the registration information in accordance with the bill. Suspension of registration does not affect the expiration date of the registration.

DESPP must include in the registry the most recent photograph of each registrant taken by DESPP, DOC, a law enforcement agency, or the Judicial Department's Court Support Services Division.

Name Changes

DESPP must revise a registrant's information whenever the court notifies the commissioner that it has issued an order for the name change of a registrant.

The DESPP commissioner must develop a protocol for notifying other state agencies, the Judicial Department, and local police departments whenever (1) a registered person changes his or her name and notifies him or (2) he determines that a registered person has changed his or her name.

Confidentiality of Gun Offender Registry Information

The registry information is not a public record for purposes of the Freedom of Information Act, and it can be disclosed only as authorized under the bill. If disclosed, any further disclosure must be as authorized by the bill.

Initial Registration

Anyone convicted, or found not guilty by reason of mental disease or defect, of a deadly weapon offense and released into the community on or after January 1, 2014, must register with DESPP within 14 calendar days after being released. Anyone in the DOC commissioner's custody must register before release as the DOC commissioner directs. The person must provide his or her name, identifying factors (such as fingerprints), criminal history record, and home and email addresses on forms and locations that the DESPP commissioner indicates. The obligation to register applies (1) whether the person lives in or out of state or (2) even if the case is on appeal. The DESPP commissioner must maintain the registration information for five years.

The bill requires the court, before accepting a plea of guilty or nolo contendere (no contest) from a person for a deadly weapon offense, to inform him or her of the registration consequences of the plea and determine that the person fully understands them.

A registrant who changes his or her name or address must notify the DESPP commissioner in writing of the change, without undue delay. During the registration period, registrants must complete and return any forms mailed to them to verify their home address and retake photographs if the commissioner requests this.

Registration Updates

People required to register must do so within 20 days after the anniversary of the initial registration date. They must go to the local police department or state police troop having jurisdiction where they live to verify and update the registration, as appropriate. The department or troop, as applicable, may defer the appearance to a later date for good cause. Not later than 30 calendar days before each anniversary date, DESPP must mail written notice of the requirement to the registrant and police department or troop, as applicable. Within 30 days of the anniversary date, the troop or department must notify the commissioner on DESPP-prescribed forms whether the registrant appeared. If the registrant's appearance was deferred, the form must show the new date and describe the good cause for the deferral.

Failure to (1) inform the DESPP commissioner of a name or address change or (2) register and update one's status as required is a class D felony. But a person's failure to notify the commissioner without undue delay of a name or address change is subject to the penalty only if the failure continues for five business days.

Registration Information

The registration information for each registrant must include:

1. the offender's name, including any aliases or other name by which he or she has been legally known;

2. identifying information, including a physical description;

3. current home address;

4. a description of the offense and the date of the conviction; and

5. the date the offender was released from incarceration, if he or she served a prison term.

The offender must sign and date the registration.

When an offender appears to register, DESPP must photograph him or her, arrange for him or her to be fingerprinted, and include the photograph and a complete set of fingerprints in the registry. If the offender must, by law, submit to the taking of a blood or other biological sample for DNA analysis and has not done so, the commissioner must also require a sample to be taken. DESPP may require the offender to provide documentation to verify the contents of the registration.

Name changes

The bill treats being on the gun offender registry the same as being on the sex offender registry with respect to court approval of name changes.

EFFECTIVE DATE: January 1, 2014

§§ 23-24 — LARGE CAPACITY MAGAZINES

The bill defines "large capacity magazine" as any firearm magazine, belt, drum, feed strip, or similar device that can, or can be readily restored or converted to accept, more than 10 rounds of ammunition. It excludes:

1. feeding devices permanently altered so that they cannot hold more than 10 rounds of ammunition,

2. . 22 caliber tube ammunition feeding devices,

3. tubular magazines contained in a lever-action firearm, or

4. permanently inoperable magazines.

With exceptions, the bill makes it a class D felony to buy, distribute, import into Connecticut, keep for sale, or offer or expose for sale LCMs.

With exceptions, anyone who possesses any LCM on or after January 1, 2014 obtained before the bill's effective date is guilty of a infraction punishable by a $ 90 fine and a class D penalty for any subsequent offense; anyone who possesses a large capacity magazine on or after January 1, 2014 that was obtained after that date is guilty of a class D felony.

Exemptions from the Ban

The following may possess, purchase, or import LCMs:

1. members or employees of DESPP, police departments, DOC, or the Armed Forces (service members) (a) for use in the discharge of their official duties or (b) when off duty;

2. employees of a NRC licensee operating a nuclear power plant in Connecticut for providing security services at the facility, or any person, firm, corporation, contractor, or subcontractor providing security at the facility; or

3. in-state manufacturers of LCM that manufacture or transport LCMs in Connecticut for sale here to exempt persons and entities above or for sale out of state.

The following may also possess LCMs:

1. gun dealers;

2. gunsmiths employed by gun dealers, who possess LCMs for servicing or repair;

3. anyone who declared possession of the magazine under the bill; or

4. executors or administrators of an estate that includes legally declared LCMs, which are disposed of as authorized by the Probate Court, if the disposition is otherwise permitted.

The bill allows transfers:

1. by bequest or intestate succession of LCMs, declared to DESPP;

2. to DESPP or a local police department; or

3. to gun dealers in compliance with the bill.

Violations

The court may order suspension of prosecution of a violation of the LCM provisions in accordance with the bill if it finds that the violation is not serious and that the violator (1) will probably not offend again, (2) has not previously been convicted of a violation of the provisions, and (3) has not previously had a prosecution for a violation suspended.

Declaring Possession of LCMs

Anyone who lawfully possesses an LCM before January 1, 2014, must apply to DESPP by January 1, 2014 to declare its possession in order to legally keep it. Service members unable to apply by January 1, 2014 because of out-of-state duty have 90 days after returning to Connecticut to declare possession of such magazine. Applications must be made on such form or in such manner as DESPP prescribes.

In addition to the prescribed LCM application form, DESPP must design or amend the applications for existing gun credentials to allow an applicant to declare possession of an LCM upon these same applications. DESPP may adopt regulations to establish application procedures.

Name and Address of People who Declare LCMs Confidential[b/]

The name and address of people who declare possession of LCMs are confidential and disclosable only to (1) law enforcement agencies and U. S. probation officers carrying out their duties and (2) the DMHAS commissioner to carry out statutory provisions pertaining to gun laws.

[b]Nonresidents Who Move to Connecticut


Anyone who moves into Connecticut in lawful possession of an LCM has 90 days to either permanently disable it, sell it to a gun dealer, or take it out of state. But servicemembers who transfer here after January 1, 2014, have 90 days after their arrival to declare possession of an LCM.

Transfers to Dealers

If an owner of an LCM transfers it to a gun dealer, the dealer must, at the time of delivery, execute a certificate of transfer.

For transfers made before January 1, 2014, the dealer must give DESPP monthly reports, on such form as the commissioner prescribes, on the number of transfers that the dealer has accepted. For transfers made on or after January 1, 2014, the dealer must send or deliver the transfer certificates DESPP. The certificate of transfer must contain:

1. the sale or transfer date;

2. the gun dealer and transferor's name and address and their Social Security or motor vehicle operator license numbers, if applicable;

3. the gun dealer's federal firearms license number; and

4. a description of the LCM.

The gun dealer must present his or her dealer's federal firearms license and seller's permit to the seller or transferor for inspection at the time of purchase or transfer.

The DESPP commissioner must maintain a file of all certificates of transfer at his central office.

Restrictions on Declared LCMs

The bill limits where a person can possess an LCM that was declared. The person may possess it only:

1. at his or her residence, place of business, or other property he or she owns, provided the LCM contains not more than 10 bullets;

2. on the premises of a target range of a public or private club or organization organized to practice target shooting;

3. at a target range that holds a regulatory or business license for practicing target shooting;

4. while on the premises of a licensed shooting club;

5. while transporting the LCM between any of the above-mentioned or to a gun dealer, provided the LCM contains no more than 10 bullets and is transported in compliance with the bill; or

6. under a valid gun permit, provided the LCM (a) is in a handgun lawfully possessed by the person before the bill took effect, (b) does not extend beyond the bottom of the pistol grip, and (c) contains no more than 10 bullets.

A violation of the provision imposing restrictions on declared LCMs is a class C misdemeanor.

EFFECTIVE DATE: Upon passage

§§ 25-31 — ASSAULT WEAPONS

Definitions

Current law defines an “assault weapon” as

1. any selective-fire firearm capable of fully automatic, semiautomatic, or burst fire at the user's option;

2. any of a list of named semiautomatic firearms;

3. any unlisted semi-automatic rifle or pistol that can accept a detachable magazine and has at least two of five specified features;

4. any semi-automatic shotgun that has at least two of four specified features; or

5. a part or combination of parts designed or intended to convert a firearm into an assault weapon if the parts may be rapidly assembled and are in the possession or under the control of the same person (see BACKGROUND for certain exemptions).

Rifles. The bill expands the banned weapons to include the following semiautomatic centerfire rifles, or copies or duplicates with the capability of any such rifles, that were in production before or on the effective date of the bill: AK 47; AK 74, AKM, AKS-74U, ARM, MAADI AK 47, MAK90, MISR, NHM90, NHM91, Norinco 56, 56S, 84S and 86S, Poly Technologies AKS and AK47, SA 85, SA 93, VEPR, WASR-10, WUM, Rock River Arms LAR-47 and Vector Arms AK-47; AR-10; AR-15; Bushmaster Carbon 15, Bushmaster XM15, Bushmaster ACR Rifles, Bushmaster MOE Rifles; Colt Match Target Rifles; Armalite M15; Olympic Arms AR-15, A1, CAR, PCR, K3B, K30R, K16, K48, K8 and K9 Rifles; DPMS Tactical Rifles; Smith and Wesson M&P15 Rifles; Rock River Arms LAR-15; Doublestar AR Rifles; Barrett REC7; Beretta Storm; Calico Liberty 50, 50 Tactical, 100, 100 Tactical, I, I Tactical, II and II Tactical Rifles; Hi-Point Carbine Rifles; HK-PSG-1; Kel-Tec Sub-2000, SU Rifles, and RFB; Remington Tactical Rifle Model 7615; SAR-8, SAR-4800 and SR9; SLG 95; SLR 95 or 96; TNW M230 and M2HB; Vector Arms UZI, Galil and Galil Sporter; Daewoo AR 100 and AR 110C; Fabrique Nationale/FN 308 Match and L1A1 Sporter; HK USC; IZHMASH Saiga AK; SIG Sauer 551-A1, 556, 516, 716 and M400 Rifles; Valmet M62S, M71S and M78S; Wilkinson Arms Linda Carbine; and Barrett M107A1.

The bill also bans any semiautomatic, centerfire rifle, regardless of the date produced, that can accept a detachable magazine that has at least one of the following features:

1. a folding or telescoping stock;

2. any grip of the weapon, including a pistol grip, thumbhole stock, or other stock that would allow an individual to grip the weapon, resulting in any finger on the trigger hand in addition to the trigger finger being directly below any portion of the action of the weapon when firing;

3. a forward pistol grip;

4. a flash suppressor; or

5. a grenade launcher or flare launcher.

It also bans semiautomatic, centerfire rifles that have (1) a fixed magazine and can accept more than 10 rounds of ammunition or (2) an overall length of less than 30 inches.

Pistols. The bill bans following specified semiautomatic pistols, or copies or duplicates thereof with the capability of any such pistols, that were in production prior to or on the effective date of this section: Centurion 39 AK, Draco AK-47, HCR AK-47, IO Inc. Hellpup AK-47, Mini-Draco AK-47 and Yugo Krebs Krink; American Spirit AR-15, Bushmaster Carbon 15, Doublestar Corporation AR, DPMS AR-15, Olympic Arms AR-15 and Rock River Arms LAR 15; Calico Liberty III and III Tactical Pistols; Masterpiece Arms MPA Pistols and Velocity Arms VMA Pistols; Intratec TEC-DC9 and AB-10; Colefire Magnum; German Sport 522 PK and Chiappa Firearms Mfour-22; DSA SA58 PKP FAL; I. O. Inc. PPS-43C; Kel-Tec PLR-16 Pistol; Sig Sauer P516 and P556 pistols; and Thompson TA5 pistols.

The bill also bans any semiautomatic pistol that can accept a detachable magazine and has at least one of the following features:

1. the ability to accept a detachable ammunition magazine that attaches at some location outside the pistol grip;

2. a threaded barrel capable of accepting a flash suppressor, forward pistol grip, or silencer; or

3. a shroud attached to, or partially or completely encircling, the barrel and that permitting the shooter to fire the firearm without being burned, except a slide that encloses the barrel; or

4. a second hand grip.

The bill also bans any semiautomatic pistol with a fixed magazine that can accept more than 10 rounds of ammunition

Shotguns. The bill bans the following shotguns or copies or duplicates with the capability of any such shotguns that were in production before or on the bill's effective date: all IZHMASH Saiga 12 shotguns.

The bill also bans semiautomatic shotguns that have both of the following features:

1. a folding or telescoping stock;

2. any grip of the weapon, including a pistol grip, a thumbhole stock, or any other stock, the use of which would allow an individual to grip the weapon, resulting in any finger on the trigger hand in addition to the trigger finger being directly below any portion of the action of the weapon when firing.

It also bans any (1) semiautomatic shotgun that can accept a detachable magazine and (2) shotgun with a revolving cylinder.

Parts Considered an Assault Weapon in Some Circumstances

The bill also bans (1) a part or combination of parts designed or intended to convert semiautomatic (a) centerfire rifles, (b) pistols, (c) shotguns, or (d) firearms into assault weapons and any combination f parts from which such an assault weapon may be assembled if possessed by, or in the possession or under the control of, the same person.

Prohibitions and Exemptions from Ban

The bill generally bans the sale, acquisition, or possession of the newly added weapons under similar conditions to the ban on assault weapons under existing law. By law, illegal possession of an assault weapon is a class D felony, with a mandatory minimum one-year prison term. Illegally transferring or carrying an assault weapon is a class C felony, with a two-year mandatory minimum prison term or, in the case of transfers to people under age 18, an additional six-year mandatory minimum. The ban on sales and transfers is effective upon passage.

Legal Possession. Under the bill, anyone who legally possessed one of the newly banned weapons on the day before the bill's effective date and who is eligible for a certificate of possession may continue to do so by applying to DESPP for this certificate by January 1, 2014 and otherwise complying with the bill. A member of the U. S. Military or Navy who is unable to apply by January 1, 2014 because he or she is out of state on official duty has 90 days after returning to Connecticut to apply for a certificate. The certificate must contain a description of the firearm that identifies it uniquely, including all identification marks; the owner's full name, address, date of birth and thumbprint; and any other information DESPP deems appropriate.

Beginning on its effective date, the bill prohibits anyone with a certificate of possession for any of the newly added assault weapons from (1) selling or transferring the weapon in Connecticut to anyone except a licensed gun dealer or (2) otherwise transferring the weapon except by (a) bequest or intestate succession or (b) prior arrangement to DESPP or a local police department. Anyone who inherits an assault weapon for which a certificate was issued has 90 days to apply for a certificate or sell the weapon to a gun dealer, permanently disable it, or take it out of state.

Anyone who moves into Connecticut in lawful possession of an assault weapon has 90 days to make it permanently inoperable, sell it to a licensed gun dealer, or take it out of state. But service members transferred to Connecticut in lawful possession of an assault weapon may apply to DESPP for a certificate within 90 days of arriving here.

Under the law and bill, anyone who possesses an assault weapon for which a certificate has been issued may possess it only at specified locations, such as his or her home or business place, at a licensed shooting club, or at a target range that holds a license for practicing target shooting.

Anyone who obtained a certificate of possession for an existing assault weapon before the bill's effective date for a weapon defined as an assault weapon by the bill is deemed to have obtained a certificate of possession for such assault weapon and must not be required to obtain a separate certificate of possession.

Exemptions

The bill contains exemptions for the newly added weapons as current law contains with regard to assault weapons. It allows the sale and possession of assault weapons to the DOC, DESPP, police departments, and Connecticut's and the U. S. military or naval forces for use in their official duties. It additionally allows sales to and possession by (a) employees of a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensee operating a nuclear power plant in Connecticut for the purpose of providing security or (b) any person, firm, corporation, contractor, or subcontractor providing security at the plant.

It allows possession by employees or members of these entities for official use. And it further specifies that it does not prohibit possession or use of assault weapons by sworn members of these agencies when on duty and within the scope of their duties.

As is the case with assault weapons for which a certificate of possession is issued under existing law, the bill allows the newly added weapons to be possessed or received, under defined circumstances, by:

1. executors or administrators of an estate that includes an assault weapon for which a certificate has been issued,

2. licensed gun dealers, and

3. gunsmiths.

Similarly, it allows for:

1. individuals to arrange to relinquish a weapon to a police department or DESPP;

2. temporary transfers or possession for certain out-of-state events; and

3. the weapons to be transported to or from a shooting competition or exhibition, display, or educational project about firearms sponsored, conducted by, approved, or under the auspices of a law enforcement agency or a national or state-recognized entity that fosters proficiency in firearms use or promotes firearms education

EFFECTIVE DATE: Upon passage

32 — ARMOR PIERCING AMMUNITION BANNED

Current law does not regulate ammunition except for banning armor-piercing . 50 caliber bullets or incendiary . 50 caliber bullets. Currently possession of the ammunition is a class D felony.

The bill expands the definition of what constitutes banned armor piercing bullets and makes their possession a class D felony.

Under current law, an “armor-piercing . 50 caliber bullet” is a . 50 caliber bullet designed, held out by the manufacturer or distributor as, or generally recognized as having a specialized capability to penetrate armor or bulletproof glass, including bullets designated as “M2 Armor-Piercing” or “AP,” “M8 Armor-Piercing Incendiary” or “API,” “M20 Armor-Piercing Incendiary Tracer” or “APIT,” “M903 Caliber . 50 Saboted Light Armor Penetrator” or “SLAP,” or “M962 Saboted Light Armor Penetrator Tracer” or “SLAPT. ”

The bill broadens the definition of “armor piercing bullet” to include any bullet that can be fired from a handgun that (1) has projectiles or projectile cores constructed entirely, excluding the presence of traces of other substances, from tungsten alloys, steel, iron, brass, bronze, beryllium copper, or depleted uranium or (2) is fully jacketed with a jacket weight or more than 25% of the total weight of the projectile is larger than . 22 caliber and is designed and intended for use in a firearm, and (3) does not have projectiles whose cores are composed of soft materials such as lead or lead alloys, zinc or zinc alloys, frangible projectiles designed primarily for sporting purposes, or any other projectiles or projectile cores that the U. S. attorney general finds to be primarily intended to be used for sporting purposes or industrial purposes or that constitutes “armor piercing ammunition” as defined in federal law. Armor piercing bullet does not include shotgun shells.

The bill makes it a class D felony to knowingly transport or carry a firearm loaded with an armor piercing bullet or incendiary . 50 caliber bullet. It exempts from the provisions the same entities and people exempt from the ban under current law:

1. DESPP, police departments, DOC or the state or U. S. military forces for use in the discharge of their official duties;

2. any executor or administrator of an estate that includes such ammunition that is disposed of as authorized by the Probate Court; and

3. the transfer by bequest or intestate succession of such ammunition.

EFFECTIVE DATE: October 1, 2013

§ 33 — AMMUNITION SEIZURE

Current law allows any two police officers (or a state's attorney), under limited circumstances, to get warrants and seize guns from anyone who poses an imminent risk of injuring himself or herself, or someone else. The bill conforms the law to current practice by allowing them to seize ammunition as well. It makes conforming and minor related changes, specifying that the procedures relating to seizure and returned firearms apply to ammunition as well.

EFFECTIVE DATE: October 1, 2013

§ 34 — AMMUNITION TRANSFERS BY INELIGIBLE PEOPLE

Under current law, not later than two business days after the occurrence of any event that makes a person ineligible to possess handguns, the person must transfer the handguns to an eligible person, surrender them to the DESPP commissioner. The bill applies the same standards to ammunition and makes conforming changes.

EFFECTIVE DATE: October 1, 2013

§ 35 — TRANSFER PROTOCOL

The bill requires the DESPP commissioner, chief state's attorney, and the Police Chiefs Association to develop a protocol for the transfer of ammunition by people ineligible to possess it.

EFFECTIVE DATE: October 1, 2013

§ 36 — RESTRAINING ORDER FORM

The bill requires the application for civil restraining orders to include a space for an alleged victim of domestic violence to indicate whether the alleged domestic violence offender possesses ammunition. It already must have space to indicate gun ownership.

EFFECTIVE DATE: October 1, 2013

§37— DOMESTIC VIOLENCE INVESTIGATIONS

The bill allows police to seize ammunition under the same circumstances as they can seize guns when investigating domestic violence crimes.

EFFECTIVE DATE: October 1, 2013

§ 38 — DOMESTIC VIOLENCE UNITS

The bill requires these units to inform the court if a domestic violence victim indicates that a defendant possesses ammunition, as is currently required for firearms.

EFFECTIVE DATE: October 1, 2013

§ 39 — DISPOSAL OF CONTRABAND

The bill requires ammunition that a court adjudges to be contraband or a nuisance turned over to the State Police for destruction or sold at public auction. Firearms are already required to be transferred.

EFFECTIVE DATE: October 1, 2013

§ 40 — STATEWIDE TRAFFICKING TASKFORCE

The bill requires the Statewide Firearms Trafficking Task Force Policy Board to deposit the receipts from the sale of seized ammunition in the General Fund, as it must currently do for receipts from sales from firearms receipts.

EFFECTIVE DATE: October 1, 2013

§ 41 — IDENTIFYING AND TRACING SEIZED AND RECOVERED FIREARMS

The bill requires the police to return any stolen ammunition seized or recovered with a stolen gun to its rightful owner.

EFFECTIVE DATE: October 1, 2013

§§ 42-43, 46-50, & 52-53 — INCREASED CRIMINAL PENALTIES FOR GUN TRAFFICKING AND OTHER GUN-RELATED OFFENSES

The bill increases penalties for a number of firearm-related crimes. Table 1 displays these crimes, their current classification, and their classifications under the bill. The penalties for the different crime classifications are in the Table on Penalties (see BACKGROUND).

Table 1: Increased Penalties for Firearm-Related Crimes

Bill

§


Crime

(CGS §)


Current Penalty


Penalty Under the Bill

42


Trafficking in firearms (53-202aa)


Class C felony if transfer less than five firearms

Class B felony if transfer five or more firearms


Class B felony

Mandatory minimum:

● Three-year prison term

● $ 10,000 fine unless the court states on the record why it remits or reduces the fine

43


Stealing a firearm (53a-212)


Class D felony


Class C felony

Mandatory minimum:

● Two-year prison term

● $ 5,000 fine unless the court states on the record why it remits or reduces the fine

46


Failing to surrender a revoked permit (29-32)


Class C misdemeanor


Class A misdemeanor

47


Transferring a pistol or revolver to a prohibited person or violating transfer procedures (29-33)


Class D felony


Class C felony

Mandatory minimum:

● Two-year prison term

● $ 5,000 fine unless the court states on the record why it remits or reduces the fine

47


Transferring a pistol or revolver to a prohibited person or violating transfer procedures, knowing the transferred weapon is stolen or has an altered identification mark (29-33)


Class B felony


Class B felony

Mandatory minimum:

● three-year prison term

● $ 10,000 fine unless the court states on the record why it remits or reduces the fine

48


Making a false statement related to a pistol or revolver transfer (29-34(a))


Class D felony


Class C felony

Mandatory minimum:

● Two-year prison term

● $ 5,000 fine unless the court states on the record why it remits or reduces the fine

48


Transferring a pistol or revolver to someone under age 21 except for target or shooting range use (29-34(b))


Class D felony

One-year mandatory minimum prison sentence


Class C felony

Mandatory minimum:

● Two-year prison term

● $ 5,000 fine unless the court states on the record why it remits or reduces the fine

49


Altering firearm identification mark, number, or name (29-36)


Up to five years in prison, a fine or up to $ 1,000, or both


Class C felony

Mandatory minimum:

● Two-year prison term

● $ 5,000 fine unless the court states on the record why it remits or reduces the fine

50


Failing to report loss or theft of firearm (2nd or subsequent offense)(53-202g)


Class D felony


Class C felony

50


Intentionally failing to report loss or theft of firearm (53-202g)


Class C felony


Class B felony

52


Failing to surrender revoked eligibility certificate (29-36i)


Class C misdemeanor


Class A misdemeanor

53


Buying a firearm intending to transfer it to an ineligible person (straw man transactions)(29-37j(a))


Up to five years in prison, fine of up to $ 1,000, or both


Class C felony

Mandatory minimum:

● Two-year prison term

● $ 5,000 fine unless the court states on the record why it remits or reduces the fine

53


Ineligible person soliciting a firearm through a straw man (29-37j(b))


Class B misdemeanor


Class D felony

Mandatory minimum:

● One-year prison term

● $ 3,000 fine unless the court states on the record why it remits or reduces the fine

(see below for additional penalties)

53


Ineligible person obtaining a firearm from a straw man (29-37j(b))


-


Class C felony

Mandatory minimum:

● Two-year prison term

● $ 5,000 fine unless the court states on the record why it remits or reduces the fine

53


Ineligible person soliciting through a straw man involving transfer of more than one firearm (29-37j(b))


Class A misdemeanor


-

53


Straw man violations when offender had felony conviction in past five years (29-37j(c))


Class D felony


Class B felony

Mandatory minimum:

● three-year prison term

● $ 10,000 fine unless the court states on the record why it remits or reduces the fine

§§ 44-45 — POSSESSION CRIMES

The law provides separate crimes punishing criminal possession of a (1) firearm or electronic defense weapon and (2) pistol or revolver. The bill expands each of these crimes and increases their penalties so that they punish illegal possession of all of these weapons under very similar circumstances and with the same penalties. The bill also punishes possessing ammunition under the same circumstances and with the same penalties.

Criminal Possession or Firearms, Ammunition, or Electronic Defense Weapons

The bill increases the penalty for criminal possession of a firearm or electronic defense weapon, expands the circumstances when someone commits this crime, and punishes someone who possesses ammunition under the same circumstances.

Under current law, a person commits this crime when he or she possesses the weapon and (1) has a prior felony conviction or conviction for a serious juvenile offense, (2) knows he or she is the subject of a restraining or protective order in certain cases or a firearms seizure order after notice and a hearing opportunity, or (3) is prohibited by federal law from having or transporting a firearm. The bill makes it illegal for these same people to possess ammunition.

The bill also punishes someone who possesses a firearm, ammunition, or an electronic defense weapon when he or she has been:

1. convicted of certain misdemeanors committed on or after October 1, 2013;

2. discharged from custody within the past 20 years after being found not guilty of a crime due to mental disease or defect;

3. confined on or after October 1, 2013 in a hospital for people with psychiatric disabilities under a probate court order within the past (a) 60 months or (b) 12 months if the person has a valid permit or certificate in effect before October 1, 2013;

4. beginning October 1, 2013, voluntarily admitted to a hospital for people with psychiatric disabilities within the past six months for care and treatment of a psychiatric disability and not solely for being an alcohol- or drug-dependent person.

The misdemeanor convictions the bill applies to are for:

1. a first offense of possessing a controlled substance other than a narcotic, a hallucinogen, or between . 5 and four ounces of marijuana (an unclassified misdemeanor for a first offense punishable by up to one year in prison, up to $ 1,000 fine, or both);

2. the following class A misdemeanors: criminally negligent homicide; 3rd degree assault; 3rd degree assault of an elderly, blind, disabled, pregnant, or intellectually disabled person; 2nd degree threatening; 1st degree reckless endangerment; 2nd degree unlawful restraint; 1st degree riot; inciting to riot; and 2nd degree stalking; and

3. the class B misdemeanor of 2nd degree riot.

The bill defines ammunition as a loaded cartridge consisting of a primed case, propellant, or projectile designed for use in a firearm.

Penalties. The bill increases the penalty for this crime from a class D to a class C felony. The law already imposes a two-year mandatory minimum sentence. The bill also imposes a mandatory minimum $ 5,000 fine unless the court states on the record why it remits or reduces the fine.

Criminal Possession of a Handgun

The bill increases the penalty for criminal possession of a pistol or revolver and expands the circumstances when someone commits this crime.

Under current law, a person commits this crime when he or she possesses the weapon and:

1. was previously convicted of a felony or one of the misdemeanors described above,

2. has a prior conviction for a serious juvenile offense,

3. has been discharged from custody within the past 20 years after being found not guilty of a crime due to mental disease or defect,

4. has been confined in a hospital for people with psychiatric disabilities under a probate court order within the past 12 months,

5. knows he or she is the subject of a restraining or protective order in certain ca


Edited by EnCon Police (04/05/13 09:16 AM)
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Fishing Info
#1490749 - 04/10/13 10:40 PM Re: New gun laws info [Re: EnCon Police]
crich240 Offline
Member

Registered: 08/28/03
Posts: 262
so does my marlin 60 22cal which has a tubular mag that can hold 14 22cal long rifle bullets make me a felon?

Eat to live...Fish to eat
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#1490768 - 04/11/13 12:33 AM Re: New gun laws info [Re: EnCon Police]
Joe.G Offline
Member

Registered: 01/03/04
Posts: 5191
It's right there in the middle of that mess.

The bill defines "large capacity magazine" as any firearm magazine, belt, drum, feed strip, or similar device that can, or can be readily restored or converted to accept, more than 10 rounds of ammunition. It excludes:

1. feeding devices permanently altered so that they cannot hold more than 10 rounds of ammunition,

2. . 22 caliber tube ammunition feeding devices,

3. tubular magazines contained in a lever-action firearm, or

4. permanently inoperable magazines.

It is the mark of an intelligent mind to be able to entertain an idea without necessarily accepting it.

What you do should speak so loudly that no one can hear what you say."

http://www.stalkerbait.com/

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#1490822 - 04/11/13 09:45 AM Re: New gun laws info [Re: EnCon Police]
Falcon Offline

Member

Registered: 11/12/02
Posts: 2669
Loc: plymouth, ct
I've got a question on all this as it is hard to follow. Does letting your 12-16 year old son or daughter use a shot gun or rifle for junior hunting as described by the DEEP rules now make you a criminal.
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#1490836 - 04/11/13 11:10 AM Re: New gun laws info [Re: EnCon Police]
macattack678 Offline

USN (Ret)

Registered: 01/25/05
Posts: 3514
Loc: North Stonington
From what I read, they just can't buy one. I didn't see anything about possession.

"Great fishermen are not born that way.....They become so through a lifetime of neglecting other things in their lives."

"Don't try to explain it. Just nod your head. Breath in. Breath out. Move on."

Jimmy Buffett

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#1490887 - 04/11/13 01:36 PM Re: New gun laws info [Re: Falcon]
EnCon Police Offline

Moderator

Registered: 03/01/04
Posts: 3874
Originally Posted By: Falcon
I've got a question on all this as it is hard to follow. Does letting your 12-16 year old son or daughter use a shot gun or rifle for junior hunting as described by the DEEP rules now make you a criminal.


No - the laws are directed primarily at purchase. Restrictions have been placed on possession of large capacity magazines and assault weapons. Your 12-16 year old hunting with a .22 or a shotgun (or a centerfire rifle on private land) is not an issue provided they have a Jr license and follow all the other rules.
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#1491062 - 04/12/13 08:50 AM Re: New gun laws info [Re: EnCon Police]
Falcon Offline

Member

Registered: 11/12/02
Posts: 2669
Loc: plymouth, ct
thank you Encon That's good news
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#1492344 - 04/17/13 08:55 PM Re: New gun laws info [Re: EnCon Police]
hrdwtr24 Offline
Member

Registered: 01/31/11
Posts: 411
Loc: Ivoryton Ct.
Well I found my 10-22!! now another question Capt. what about AR-15 parts?? I can see nothing in there anywhere about them.... kinda like don't ask don't tell???
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#1492504 - 04/18/13 12:35 PM Re: New gun laws info [Re: hrdwtr24]
EnCon Police Offline

Moderator

Registered: 03/01/04
Posts: 3874
Originally Posted By: hrdwtr24
Well I found my 10-22!! now another question Capt. what about AR-15 parts?? I can see nothing in there anywhere about them.... kinda like don't ask don't tell???


I don't know. My understanding is that if it's a lower that has a pistol grip and can accept detachable mags then it's an assault weapon.

Uppers, barrels, stocks, etc. are not addressed in the law.
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#1492582 - 04/18/13 07:23 PM Re: New gun laws info [Re: EnCon Police]
hrdwtr24 Offline
Member

Registered: 01/31/11
Posts: 411
Loc: Ivoryton Ct.
Originally Posted By: EnCon Police
Originally Posted By: hrdwtr24
Well I found my 10-22!! now another question Capt. what about AR-15 parts?? I can see nothing in there anywhere about them.... kinda like don't ask don't tell???


I don't know. My understanding is that if it's a lower that has a pistol grip and can accept detachable mags then it's an assault weapon.

Uppers, barrels, stocks, etc. are not addressed in the law.


Thank you... that answers my question...
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#1566609 - 03/19/14 06:22 PM Re: New gun laws info [Re: EnCon Police]
furtrapper Offline

Member

Registered: 05/15/06
Posts: 1543
my understanding regarding deer hunting with a 6.8 AR 15...must now have land owners permission to use a so called assault weapon....and must also caryy the regesterd paper work ....sound bout right.......

dddd
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